Abaris Golden Arrow

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Abaris Golden Arrow
Role Homebuilt civil utility aircraft
Manufacturer Abaris Aircraft

The Abaris Golden Arrow was a planned homebuilt civil utility aircraft, intended to be manufactured in kit form. It was an unusually large aircraft for its type, able to seat six people (including the pilot) and, also unusually in a homebuilt plane, powered by a turboprop engine.[1]

The Golden Arrow was intended to be of conventional monoplane configuration, with retractable tricycle undercarriage and a T-tail. It was largely of composite construction.

The craft derived its name from a legendary arrow, carried by the ancient Greek sage Abaris the Hyperborean. The arrow, given to Abaris by the sun-god Apollo, conferred upon its bearer the power of flight.[2]

In 2003, the first aircraft was not yet complete when the company closed down.

Specifications (estimated)[edit]

Data from[citation needed]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 5 pax
  • Length: 31 ft 3 in (9.53 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 0 in (12.80 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 0 in (3.66 m)
  • Airfoil: NACA 65-215[3]
  • Empty weight: 3,000 lb (1,361 kg)
  • Gross weight: 5,800 lb (2,631 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Walter M601 turboprop, 750 hp (560 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 274 kn (315 mph, 507 km/h)
  • Range: 1,450 nmi (1,670 mi, 2,690 km)
  • Service ceiling: 26,000 ft (7,900 m)
  • Rate of climb: 3,425 ft/min (17.40 m/s)
  • Power/mass: 0.13 hp/lb (0.21 kW/kg)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Abaris Aircraft". Internet Archive Wayback Machine. February 4, 2012. Archived from the original on February 4, 2012. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  2. ^ Nettesheim, Heinrich (1993). Three Books of Occult Philosophy. Llewellyn Worldwide. p. 785. ISBN 0875428320.
  3. ^ Lednicer, David. "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". m-selig.ae.illinois.edu. Retrieved 16 April 2019.

External links[edit]